Instructed by Virginia Thomas at Rice University

Golubkov Family, early 1900s / image courtesy of Bogorodsk-Noginsk

PREVIOUS: Creating Children’s Media

Instructed by Dr. Julie Dobrow at Tufts University

The Optics Of Kinship: Reframing Family Photography In U.S. History

School: Rice University

Course: The Optics of Kinship:

Instructor: Virginia Thomas

Course Description:

This course will look at the history of photography as a powerful force in constructing the politics of family in the US. By looking at photographs from history, art, and our own families, students will learn how photography shaped not just familial norms, but race, gender, sexuality, and national belonging.

Ask the Instructor: Virginia Thomas


Instructed by Julie Dobrow at Tufts University

Art Garfunkel guest-stars in an episode of PBS’ ‘Arthur’

PREVIOUS: Visual Narratives and Colors of the Americas

Instructed by Sandy Rodriguez at California Institute of Technology

If you were an elementary school student in the 1990s or early 2000s, it’s likely that you remember a class period in which your science teacher, too tired to instruct, rolled a boxy VCR to the front of the classroom and popped in a Bill Nye the Science Guy tape. …


Instructed by Sandy Rodriguez at California Institute of Technology

Photo courtesy of Kirk McKoy / Los Angeles Times

PREVIOUS: Music and the Environment in Northeast Asia

Instructed by Kip Hutchins at Oberlin College and Conservatory

Color is a medium for storytelling. Artists use colors to signify values, traditions, and emotions. Key elements of a story can be highlighted with eye-catching red or blue within a hazy or dark context. To hand process ones pigments is to practice a alchemical science. Bold tones are synthesized from ingredients such as crushed scale insects, minerals, or bark.

Before globalization –– back when Amazon was still just a rain forest –– artists typically only had access to materials found to their…


Instructed by Kip Hutchins at Oberlin College and Conservatory

Image courtesy of CChatty

PREVIOUS: Drawing: Who’s Telling the Story?

Instructed by Tae Hwang at Johns Hopkins University

What do spike fiddles, singing garbage trucks, and Gobi Desert dust storms have in common?

To Kip Hutchins, Henry Luce Foundation Scholar and Visiting Assistant Professor at Oberlin College & Conservatory, they are all evidence of the vast cultural exchange practiced between contiguous nations in Northeast Asia –– and indicative of the environmental consequences one region can enact upon another. Hutchins examines these topics in his interdisciplinary course, Music and the Environment in Northeast Asia.

Music and the Environment in Northeast Asia

School: Oberlin College & Conservatory

Course: Music and the Environment in Northeast Asia

Instructor: Kip Hutchins

Course Description:

This course introduces students to a survey of…


Instructed by Tae Hwang at Johns Hopkins University

Tae Hwang and artist MR Barnadas’s arts initiative, Collective Magpie, created The “Poetic Exploration of Race Survey” and its corresponding “Who Design’s Your Race?” signage in an ongoing series, currently on display at El Museo.

PREVIOUS: E3: Emerson’s Entrepreneurial Experience

Instructed by Professor Lu Ann Reeb at Emerson College

A picture is worth a thousand words ––but when spoken by who, and to whom? If history is ‘written by the victors’, as is commonly espoused, then are these victors likewise responsible for the historical images which have defined our understanding of the past?

In Drawing: Who’s Telling the Story?’, Johns Hopkins University adjunct instructor Tae Hwang examines the historical usage of propaganda, bias in contemporary media, and data (mis)representation across a variety of visual mediums.

Drawing: Who’s Telling the Story?

School: Johns Hopkins University

Course: Drawing: Who’s Telling the Story?

Instructor: Tae Hwang

Course Description:

What makes an image truthful? Students will create drawings utilizing both traditional and unconventional processes…


Instructed by Professor Lu Ann Reeb at Emerson College

A former Emerson student presents his product at the 2019 E3 Pitch Competition. Image courtesy of Emerson College, via Flickr.

PREVIOUS: Cultures of Computing

Instructed by Ricky Crano at Tufts University

Emerson College is renowned for offering robust, creative programs for those pursuing careers in cinematography, writing, performing arts, and…. entrepreneurship?

It may surprise some to know that the Boston-based arts college has offered a minor in Entrepreneurship since 2005, long before other universities around the nation began providing it as a pathway within their business programs. …


Instructed by Ricky Crano at Tufts University

PREVIOUS: Megafauna Among Us: Humans and other Charismatic Animals

Instructed by Dr. Zoë Eddy at Harvard University

Modern computational technologies have been in a period of rapid development since their initial introduction to the public. In the past three decades, cellphones have shrunk in size while dramatically increasing in power and ability. Social media platforms have shattered records in winning billion dollar valuations –– and the hearts of their users –– while building a global community of creatives. Major medical advancements have been made possible thanks to crowdsourcing platforms and cloud data-sharing.

As the technology industry has grown, so too has our…


Instructed by Dr. Zoë Eddy at Harvard University

A still from ‘Tiger King’, courtesy of Netflix

PREVIOUS: Hacking 4 Recovery

Instructed by Steve Blank at Stanford University

What makes an animal ‘charismatic’, exactly? And for that matter, what makes a person charismatic? The English language is full of idiomatic phrases making reference to animals: wiley like a fox. As strong as an ox. Wise like an owl. When did mankind begin to imbue creatures with human traits?

Harvard instructor Zoë Eddy explores how interspecies exchange affects environmental and wildlife policy through a variety of lenses in her interdisciplinary course, Megafauna Among Us: Humans and other Charismatic Animals.

School: Harvard University

Course: Megafauna Among Us: Humans and other Charismatic Animals

Instructor: Zoë Eddy

Course Description:

Whales, wolves, great apes, big…


Instructed by Steve Blank at Stanford University

Throughout his illustrious career, Steve Blank has held a number of titles: he was a military man. A serial entrepreneur. An author. An investor. Perhaps Blank’s most notable moniker, however, is ‘the Father of the Lean Startup Movement’ –– a name he earned after popularizing the methodologies of business-hypothesis-experimentation and validated learning.

Now an adjunct instructor at Stanford University, he goes by another title: Professor.

Hacking 4 Recovery

School: Stanford University

Course: Hacking 4 Recovery

Instructor: Steve Blank

Course Description:

COVID-19 has upended traditional ways of doing business, travel, education, etc. How do these institutions reconfigure themselves? What new businesses, products, and services will emerge? …


PREVIOUS: The Endangered Adjunct, Part 4

In 1969, 80% of faculty members held tenure-track positions. Today, contingent faculty accounts for 70% of all faculty in the United States — and that number is quickly rising. Entrance into the ivory tower has grown more accessible over the past century, while opportunities to rise to the tower’s top — to achieve success within the professorial career path of Academia — have stagnated.

The resulting adjunct crisis has created a ‘gig economy’ for hiring short-term university instructors at part-time prices, as well as a highly-saturated pool of doctorate-holding applicants who must compete for just a handful of tenured positions.

Sanna Sharp

covering higher education for Campuswire

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store